Sunday, May 10, 2015

The Thatcher Brick Wall

It annoys me that I haven't been able to find any new information on my great-grandfather Alexander M. Thatcher (born 18 July 1818 and died 13 Jan 1880).  It doesn't help that he was working class, an employee in a paper company, who died from tuberculosis.  I decided to take advantage of resources listed at Cyndislist.com.  I couldn't access the ones from Ancestry, but I could get to the ones by Michael John Neill.  I found the Problem Solving one helpful and I decided to look at the information again. 

In my family you can't always arrive at the truth following a straight line.  Some document said that Alexander was from Chester.  Most documents said he was from Pennsylvania.  What if Chester was right but the state was wrong?  I decided to take a look at that.  It turns out that would give me several more places to look:

  • Chester, Delaware, PA
  • Chester, Hampden, MA 
  • Chester, Middlesex,CT
  • Chester, Morris, NJ
  • Chester, Orange, NY
  • Chester, Rockingham, NH
  • Chester, Windsor, VT
I will try the New England ones first.  Alexander once lived in Hampshire County, next to Hampden Co. Middlesex County, CT, and Windsor County, VT, are along the Connecticut River, which could have brought him to Hampshire County.  Chester, NH, is a little farther away, but makes more sense than Chester in New York or New Jersey. 

Saturday, May 2, 2015

Searching for Mid-Western Landrum Cousins

I would like to get in touch with the family of my great-aunt Pearl G. Baker and her husband John L. Landrum.  Pearl was the only child of my great-grandparents Andrew Baker and Margaret Gatton to stay behind in Ohio when they moved to Kalamazoo in 1909.  Pearl was their oldest surviving daughter and she had married John Lewis Landrum 5 Dec 1896 in Paulding Co.  By this time John and Pearl had four children, one dying without a first name and probably stillborn.  Their fifth child was born in 1909.  The 1900 federal census shows them living six households away from Pearl’s parents. The family must have been close and it must have been very difficult for the grandparents and grandchildren to part. 
Grandmother Gertrude Baker Winchell
Pearl’s sister Gertrude Baker (my grandmother) was the only sibling to move east, to eastern New York State.  My father and his three siblings were all born in Kalamazoo.  The family moved east in 1930 and it must have been another emotional time for the grandparents.  
Andy and Maggie's grandsons Andy and Roy in Michigan
My family lost contact with the Michigan cousins after my uncle Andy stopped driving out to the state to visit relatives.  However, in 2006 the wife of my great-aunt Osie Baker Dunifin’s grandson found me because of the Internet and I drove out there that summer to visit and attend a family reunion.

Osie's grandson Wayne Dunifin and wife Karon

I’m in contact with the granddaughter and great-grandson of my great-grandfather’s brother Albin Baker who moved to the state of Washington.  I’ve corresponded with a descendant of their brother Stephen.  I’m in touch with granddaughters of their brother Riley. Great-Aunt Pearl’s family is the only one completely unaccounted for.  I’ve collected some names and dates, but I’d really like to know more about Pearl and her family, my cousins.  Pearl herself wouldn’t even be able to tell me much because she died at the age of 39 and her youngest child was one year old. 

Here is information I have on Pearl Baker, her husband John Lewis Landrum and their family. Many of the family were buried in Dealey Cemetery in Payne, Paulding Co.

John Lewis Landrum (back left) and his brothers
I. John Lewis Landrum was born on 24 September 1871 in Paulding Co., Ohio, the son of Robert Leon Landrum and Nancy Huff.   John Lewis Landrum and Pearl Baker were married on 5 December 1896 in , Paulding Co.   On By April 1910 the family was living in Benton Township, Paulding Co. where John made his living as a farmer. That is where Pearl died on 14 February 1920, age 39. 

By 1926 John married his second wife Rose Vonier. They had daughter Mary in December 1927.  On 4 April 1930 John was a farmer in Monroe Township, Adams Co., IN.  However, their son John Landrum died not even a year old in Three Rivers, St. Joseph Co., MI, on 10 April 1932.

Rose passed away before 1940 when John was enumerated living in Monroe Township and had his daughter Donna and her family living with him.  John died from a stroke on 4 December 1945 at the age of 74 in Monroe, Adams Co., IN.

John Lewis Landrum and Pearl Baker had the following children:

Donna and Eva Landrum

a.      John William Landrum was born on 24 October 1897 in Union Township, Van Wert Co., OH. He died in 1965 at the age of 68 in Benton Township, Paulding Co.  John William Landrum and Oletha Merl Brown were married on 1 February 1919 in Paulding Co. Oletha Merl Brown, daughter of Clark Brown and Mary Riggs, was born on 2 August 1897 in Homer, Champaign Co., IL. She died in 1940 at the age of 43 in Benton Township.

John William Landrum and Oletha Merl Brown had the following children:

                                                     i.     Louis Landrum was born on 6 November 1903 in Payne, Paulding Co. Louis Landrum and Naomi Sapp were married on 6 February 1943. Naomi Sapp, daughter of Joe Sapp and Lillie Brunner, was born on 17 September 1924 in Adams Co., IN.

                                                  ii.     Ralph W. Landrum was born on 25 August 1919 in Paulding Co., OH.  Ralph W. Landrum and Mary K. Kiser were married on 19 March 1946 in Adams Co., IN. Mary K. Kiser, daughter of Kenneth Kiser and Clara Uhrick, was born on 28 April 1928 in Adams Co.

                                                 iii.     Helen Agnes Landrum was born on 26 July 1929 in Grover Hill, Paulding Co. Helen Agnes Landrum and Carl Richard Breman were married on 14 October 1950 in Indiana. Carl Richard Breman, son of Richard Paul Breman and Florence Opal Archbold, was born on 14 December 925 in Fort Wayne, Allen Co., IN.

b.       Male Landrum was born in 1898. He died in 1898 at the age of 0.

c.      Gladys M. Landrum was born on 5 February 1901 in Benton Township, Paulding Co. She died on 21 March 1991 at the age of 90 in Benton Township. Gladys M. Landrum and Homer F. Price were married on 4 May 1920 in Paulding Co. Between 1930 and 1940 the couple lived in Benton Township.  In December 1945 Gladys and Homer lived in the village of Payne, Paulding Co. Homer F. Price, son of William David Price and Estella Craig, was born in September 1895 in Benton Township. He died on 30 June 1987 at the age of 91 in Benton Township, Paulding Co.

d.     Gladys M. Landrum and Homer F. Price had the following children:

1.      Dorothy M. Price was born circa 1921.

2.     Teresa Price was born circa 1922.

3.      June Price was born circa 1923.

4.     William Dean Price was born on 13 August 1925 in Payne, Paulding Co. He died on 9 December 1977 at the age of 52 in Paulding Co. William Dean Price and Betty Lou Robinson were married on 13 April 1946 in Auburn, Dekalb Co., IN.  Betty Lou Robinson, daughter of James B. Robinson and Cora A. Mercer, was born on 13 May 1927 in Grabill, Allen Co., IN, USA.  She died in 1986 at the age of 59.

William Dean Price and Betty Lou Robinson had the following child:

a.      Brenda J Price was born on 25 July 1950. She died on 9 August 1999 at the age of 49 in Kendallville, Noble Co., IN. She was married to a man with the last name of Jackson

e.      Maggie Ellen Landrum was born on 28 August 1905 in Paulding Co. She died on 29 August 1991 at the age of 86 in Adams Co., IN. Maggie Ellen Landrum and Roy White were married on 20 December 1922 in Payne, Paulding Co. The couple lived in Fort Wayne, Allen Co., IN in 1930 and moved to Decator, Adams Co., IN in time to appear in the 1930 federal census. They lived there through December 1945. Roy White, son of Lewis White and Belle Driver, was born on 21 April 1903 in Payne, Paulding Co.  

Maggie Ellen Landrum and Roy White had the following children:

                                                    i.     Isabel E. White was born circa 1924 in OH. She died in 1994 at the age of 70.

                                                  ii.     Lois Ann White was born circa 1934 in IN.

f.        Robert Andrew Landrum was born in June 1909 in Benton Township, Paulding Co. He died at age 12 years 13 days on 25 June 1921 in Paulding Co.

g.       Lillian Landrum was born in 1915. She died in 1915 at the age of 0.


h.     Donna B. Landrum was born on 11 August 1916 in Benton Township, Paulding Co. She died in 2004 at the age of 88 in IN. Donna B. Landrum and Robert Louis Bailey were married on 20 March 1937 in  Adams Co., IN. They appeared in the census in 1940 in Monroe Township, Adams Co., IN. Robert Louis Bailey, son of Peter Bailey and Mamie Urick, was born on 4 December 1912 in Monroe, Adams Co., IN.  He died in 1980 at the age of 68 in Adams Co.

Donna B. Landrum and Robert Louis Bailey had the following children:

                                                    i.     Norma Jean Bailey was born circa 1938. She married Larry Wilson and they lived in Celina, Mercer Co., OH, in 2011.

                                                  ii.     David L. Bailey was born on 1 May 1945 in Decatur, Adams Co., IN He died on 20 September 2011 at the age of 66 in Decatur, Adams Co., IN. David L. Bailey and Carol A. Rumschlag were married on 11 August 1988.

David L. Bailey and Carol A. Rumschlag had the following child:

1.      Danielle R. Bailey lived in Decatur, Adams Co., IN, in 2011.

                                                 iii.     Nancy Bailey who married a man with the last name of Sidle. She lived in Decatur, Adams Co., IN, in 2011.

i.      Eva R. Landrum was born in February 1919 in Benton Township, Paulding Co.  Her husband was  W. L. Durham.

I.                John Lewis Landrum and Rose Vonier were married about 1925. She was born about 1908 in Ohio. She died before 1940.

John Lewis Landrum and Rose Vonier had the following children:

a.      Mary Landrum was born in December 1927.
b.     John Landrum, died less than one year old on 10 April 1932 in Three Rivers, St. Joseph Co., MI.




Friday, March 20, 2015

The Pleasant-Looking Woman

My cousin Bob recently shared with me another family photo.  The man in the photo is my great-grandfather Henry F. Winchell.  Bob wondered who the pleasant-looking woman was.  She is as new to me as the photo.  Gazing at it for a while, I realized that there was a strong resemblance between the two people.  I thought it likely that the woman was a female cousin.  Then I started going through my records to see who it might be.
My top candidates are Mary Lucinda Strong Church and Lucinda Surriner Bailey.  Mary Lucinda "Lucinda" Strong was born on 24 February 1853 in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co., MA.  She was the daughter of Henry’s aunt Samantha Winchell and her husband Isaac Strong and lived around the corner from Henry on the main street of Housatonic, Mass.  She married Albert N. Church on 20 November 1872.  

Lucinda Surriner was born on 28 August 1863 in Great Barrington, Berkshire Co., MA, the daughter of Henry’s aunt Henrietta Winchell and her husband Uriah Surriner.  She lived with her parents around the corner from Henry on Kirk Street.  Her husband William Bailey died in 1901 at the age of 41. The federal census records did not always list the locality these women and their families were living in, but I think they were always in Housatonic. I wonder why the first name Lucinda was popular at this time.

Then I recalled I had this photo:

I thought I'd written about this photo before.  There are at least six women from my family pictured.  However, I'm not sure how the author of the caption read the photo. Did s/he start from the front of the table on the left or the left edge of the photo?  Either way it does seem that Mary Lucinda Strong Church is the last woman on the right.  There's slight highlighting near her eyes that make it look like she's wearing glasses.  Her hair is dark, though, and her face seems different, heavier.  Is it safe to say, then, the female cousin in the photo is Lucinda Surriner Bailey?

The other candidates are Grace G. Warner and her sister Nellie E. Warner.  They were the daughters of Henry’s aunt Julia Winchell and her husband Asahel Warner.  They are less likely because they eventually moved away from the area, but about the same age, so I’m including them. Their cousin Nathaniel Warner owned a large parcel of land right behind the John Winchell home on Hart Street.

Grace G. Warner was born on 28 September 1878 in Great Barrington. She and Paul Millard Elsden were married on 28 November 1901 by Robert F. Elsden of Stockbridge, MA in Great Barrington. After their marriage they lived in various places that Paul’s work took them:  1905 in Norwich, Chenango Co., NY; 1910 in Waverly, Bremer Co., IA;  1918 in Sacramento Co., CA; and 1925 in Boonville, Oneida Co., NY.

Nellie E. Warner was born on 2 February 1866 in Great Barrington. She and Elery D. Smith were married on 16 November 1887 in her hometown. They lived in the area until they moved to Springfield, Hampden Co., MA, USA in time to appear on the 1920 census.  

Perhaps someday something will be found to confirm the identity of this cousin.  This photo gives me a good feeling.  It is usually nice men who take the time to pose easily with their female cousins for photos.  

Monday, March 16, 2015

Another New Role

It looks like I'll be taking on another new role: keeper of the family tombstones.


I received a message back from the president of the Mellenville Union Cemetery Association.  I have permission to clean my great-uncle's tombstone, and he said no one else would do it.  That makes it pretty clear.  My great-uncle and his wife lie behind the large rectangle stone near the center of the photo.

I wonder if it's the same case in Berkshire County.  At one time I visited the cemetery near the old Great Barrington Fair.  I think it was after the tornado hit the area.  Most of the tombstones were illegible.  I believe they were cleaned the wrong way some time in history.  That was a great shame.  The old tombstones are more delicate that you'd think.

I was warned to wait until the snow melted and the mud dried up.  I guess he doesn't expect everyone to be a country girl.

I started a spreadsheet of family graves, starting with the earliest known one for George Winchell.  There are a lot of graves in Berkshire County!  It's difficult to know the best way to format the spreadsheet, but I do need it.


Sunday, January 25, 2015

Time to Heal and Time Team

I had to take a break from writing blogs because I sprained my right shoulder in late September.  I found out the hard way that nursing home wheelchairs are like pushing a grocery cart with a wonky wheel.  I work at a brisk pace on the computer all day, so I've come home at night to ice my shoulder and watch Time Team.



The original regular members were (left to right above) Tony Robinson as the presenter, Phil Harding, Prof. Mick Aston as the site coordinator and Carenza Lewis. Time Team is a very enjoyable program to watch.  A few archaeologists wanted to find a way to bring history to the people and educate them about their own country.  It ran for 20 years!  The first few years had only 4 episodes, then it jumped to 13 episodes a year.  There were also many specials.  The people featured on the program were educated, good-natured and intelligent, sometimes funny.  Each program also involved a few specialists in a given area, like Roman architecture or British pottery. In many episodes there would also be a specialist who would try to reproduce something of the time period under investigation, like a mill for Saxon mortar. Sometimes the team were invited by one individual, or an entire village, to investigate what's in their backyard.  Sometime they were invited by a government agency.  Out of the 230 sites they investigated, 210 were then legally protected.  That's a pretty good record.

I have a lot of English ancestors.  It's been a very enjoyable and entertaining way to see what Great Britain looks like and to learn some history.  Yes, I wondered if they would excavate something related to my ancestors.  They did, eventually, on my mother's side.  I will write about that on Wabash Valley Families.

I was very sad to discover that Mick Aston passed away.  He didn't think he made much difference.  He must have, or the villages and the government agencies wouldn't have invited  the team to do digs.  The series wouldn't have run for 20 years.  When it started in 1993, there was no Internet and no World-Wide Web.  People around the world watch Time Team now and enjoy watching the archaeology and the history revealed.  

PBS attempted to make archaeology popular in this country  by presenting Time Team America.  I think there've been only 9 episodes.  Why the big difference?  I know there's not the allure of having Mesolithic, Neolithic, Bronze Age, Iron Age, Roman, Saxon, Norman, Medieval and Tudor finds all in one backyard, but how long ago was 1492? The Vikings were here in the 11th century. I tend to think not that many people in this country are interested in history.

Saturday, November 8, 2014

Mohican Place Names


It has been thought that few Mohican place names were known.  Upon listing these place names, one can see that this is not the case.  The names do exist if someone cares to find them.  Further, the recorded names attest to the Mohican people as the original holders of the land. 

The majority of this information comes from “Appendix A:  Recorded Land Transactions” and “Appendix B:  Names, Locations, Relationships” in Shirley Dunn’s book The Mohicans and Their Land 1609-1730, Fleischmanns, N.Y.:  Purple Mountain Press Ltd., 1994.  Other information has been gleaned from additional sources. 

Corresponding present day locations are noted in red.


Mohican Name
English Name or Description
Mohican Owner
Achkoockpeek
Lake in southern Columbia Co., N.Y.

Achneganick
The second of four flats along the Housatonic River, Litchfield Co., Conn. or Berkshire Co., Mass. (see Kenachkehantick, Awaankaniss, Taashammik)

Amissohaendiek
The land named in the Saratoga Patent

Assiskowachkok
The fourth of five large flats at Leeds, Greene Co., N.Y.

Awaankaniss
The third of four flats along the Housatonic River, Litchfield Co., Conn. or Berkshire Co., Mass. (see Kenachkehantick, Achenganik, Taashammik)

Cachtanaquick
Lower Schodack Island, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Canasenix
Kill in Greene Co., N.Y. (see Pesquanachqua)

Caniskek
Tract of land along the Murderer’s Creek near Athens, Greene Co., N.Y.

Chawtiekignank/Chawtishegnack
Creek in Schoharie Co., N.Y.

Cickhekawick
Land at the mouth of the Kinderhook Creek

Escotak
Schodack, N.Y.

Gastanek
Albany, Albany, Co., N.Y.

Gawamick
Tract of land on the Murderer’s creek near Athens, Greene Co., N.Y.

Gokameko
Ancram, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Hapamewaisck
Largest of three islands opposite Menands, Albany Co., N.Y.
Passenehennewou, Cawichtack
Hiethoock
Lake in northern Columbia Co., N.Y.

Hoseke
Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Kaghkamekack
Location in Columbia Co., N.Y.

Kaphack/Kapakagh (probably)
Northernmost of two flats on the west side of the Housatonic River in Berkshire Co., Mass. (see Machachquichkak)

Kaunameek
Indian village near Brainard, N.Y.

Kehantick
Field (maize land) in North Greenbush, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Kenachkehantick
Falls in the Housatonic River, Litchfield Co., Conn. or Berkshire Co., Mass.

Kewaghteqak
The creek “running into the great Kinderhook hill,” Columbia Co., N.Y.

Kichpa
One of three flats in southern Columbia Co., N.Y. (see Nickan hoek and Wichquaskaha)

Kokohamok
Lake in the Town of Salisbury, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Kyskitam meetshe
Tract of land on the north side of the Katterskill, near Kiskatom, Greene Co., N.Y.

Koxhackhung
Coxsackie, Greene Co., N.Y.
Sioketa, Sachamoes
Mathahenaack
Land at Half Moon, Saratoga Co., N.Y.

Machachquichkak
Southernmost of two flats on the west side of the Housatonic River, Berkshire Co., Mass. (see Kaphack)

Machaktehank
Location in Litchfield Co., Conn.

Machemene Pakak
The fourth and northernmost of four flats along the Housatonic River, Litchfield Co., Conn. or Berkshire Co., Mass. (see Pacachkook, Soquawaen, Nanachquak, Taasham)

Mackawameek
Barents’ or Barren Island

Maghtequack
Lower Schodack Island, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Mahaskekook
A cripple bush in southern Columbia Co., N.Y.

Mannanpenokcon
Brook in Berkshire Co., Mass.

Manskuseehoank
Rattlesnake Mountain, Town of Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Mawauaemkaeck
Brook in Washington Co., N.Y.

Maquamsasick
One of two plains on the Catskill Creek, Town of Cairo, Greene Co., N.Y. (see Taghpokight)

Maroomskaak
Creek in Washington Co., N.Y. flowing into the Hoosick River

Mathahenaack
Foremost of the land called Halfe Moone

Mawanaqasick
Woodland and high woods in Columbia Co., N.Y.

Muhheconnetuck
Hudson River, New York State

Nabdskoock
Bears Island

Nachawinasick
Land surrounding and including the Cohoes Falls, N.Y.

Nachawithquaack
Location on the Hoosick River, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.


Nachtemack
Half Moon, Saratoga Co., N.Y.

Makemekassick
Kline Kill, a small creek emptying into the Kinderhook Creek Columbia Co., N.Y.

Nanachquak
The second of four flats along the Housatonic River, Litchfield Co., Conn. and Berkshire Co., Mass. (see Pacachkook, Soquawaen, Taasham, Maachemene Pakak)

Nanoseck
Small island near Papscanee Island, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.  Also called Little Coopers Island
Syme, Capachick, Nachonan
Nehanenesick
Green Island, Albany Co., N.Y.

Nickan hooke
One of three flats in southern Columbia Co., N.Y. (see Kichpa and Wichquaskaha)

Noten Hoeck
Nutten Hook

Owseetumac
Housatonic River, Berkshire Co., Mass. And Connecticut

Paanpack
Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.
Peyhaunet, Skiwias (Aepjen)
Pacachkook
The area containing four flats aong the Housatonic River, Litchfield Co., Conn. and Berkshire Co., Mass. (see Soquawaen, Nanachquak, Taasham, and Maachemene Pakak)

Pachgatgoch
Location 40 miles downstream from Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Pachanhanit
Green Island, Albany Co., N.Y.

Pachkanesecq
Kill in Columbia Co., N.Y.

Pachonakelick
An island one half mile above Castleton, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.  Also called Ghonankenigh Island
Maghsapeet (Machack niemanauw), Sansewaneuwe, Paneensenn, Nipapoa
Pachquyak
Third of five large flats at Leeds, Greene Co., N.Y.

Packwack/Pachwack
Falls in Housatonic River, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Palipapaenpemock
Creek in Columbia Co., N.Y.

Pamshenakasick
Woodland in North Greenbush, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Panamesick
Flat land in Columbia Co., N.Y.

Panhooseck
Land from the Hudson River to the Poestenkill and between the two rivers, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Paponicuck
Muitzeskill Creek
Wanemenhett, Askantha
Papsickene
Papscanee Island, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.
Casehot, Onhaseme, Kamkebock, Sickewope, Nosenack, Ochkock
Paptaneck
Location in Columbia Co., N.Y.

Pasanthkack
Kinderhook Creek, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Paskoecq
Kill near Leeds, Greene Co., N.Y.

Patkook
One of ten flats along the river and kill beyond the Claverack Creek (see Potamhasik and Stichsooch)
Keesieway (Pamitapiet)
Patschachticoke, meaning where the rivers or streams fork
Near Claverack, on Claverack Creek

Pawachtuek
Falls in the Housatonic River, Litchfield Co., Conn. or Berkshire Co., Mass.

Pegtels
Small island, Albany Co., N.Y.

Pesquanachqua
Tract of land in Greene Co., N.Y. along the Katterskill Creek

Pittanoock
Creek in northern Columbia Co., N.Y.

Pompenick
Land above Kinderhook, Columbia Co., N.Y., on the east side of the Kinderhook Creek

Ponsumpie
Ore Hill (Ancram, Ancramdale?)

Popgassick
Woodland in Lansingburgh, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Potakuk
Location 20 miles downstream from Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Potamhasik
One of ten flats along the river and kill beyond the  Claverack Creek (see Patkook and Stichsooch)
Keesieway (Pamitapiet)
Potik
The fifth of five large flats at Leeds, Greene Co., N.Y.

Potschotack
Land in Columbia Co., N.Y.

Preeuwen hoeck
Tract of land from the second cliff to the little kill along the  Claverack Creek

Puttanhenck
Small waterfall in Columbia Co., N.Y.

Quachanock
Tract of land in Greene Co., N.Y. near the Katterskill Creek

Quahemesicos
Van Schaick Island, part of Cohoes, Albany Co., N.Y.

Quatawichnaak
A fall on the Katterskill Creek

Quequictenhoecke
Falls on the Hoosic River

Querapogatt
Location in Litchfield Co., Conn.

Quisichkook
Jansens Kill near Tachkanick

Sanchaiek/Sanckhaik
Three flats of land along the western part of the Hoosic River
Also, a tract of land in Washington Co., N.Y.

Sankhasick
Island opposite Bethlehem, Albany Co., N.Y.
Wickepe, Wawwanhusqua, Osquasin, Seepsin, Kanochgape, Kachackpa, Manhachsepite wewan
Sanckhenak
Land at the mouth of the Roelof Jansen Kill, southern Columbia Co., N.Y.

Sapgtnack/Saptanok/Sassgtonack
Falls in Housatonic River, Berkshire Co., Mass. (also called Tapgtonak)

Sasskahampka
Location in southern Columbia Co., N.Y.

Schaahkook
Schaghticoke, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Semesseeck
Tract of land on the east bank of the Hudon River between Rensselaer and Castleton, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Sepewechkaseck
Tract of land in Columbia Co., N.Y.

Shekomeko
Shekomeko, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Siekatom
Hill at Coeymans, N.Y.

Soquawaen
The first of four plains along the Housatonic River, Litchfield Co., Conn. and Berkshire Co., Mass. (see Pacachkook, Nanachquak, Taasham, Machemene Pakak)

Squampamuck
Ghent, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Squegkanekaneck
Location in Berkshire Co., Mass. Or Columbia Co., N.Y.

Squoghantkaneek
Location in Berkshire Co., Mass. Or Columbia Co., N.Y.

Stichsooch
One of ten flats along the river and kill beyond the Claverack Creek (see Potamhasick and Patkook)
Keesieway (Pamitapiet)
Stichtekook
High woods in Greene Co., N.Y.

Styffsink
Hill to the west of the Nutten Hook, N.Y.

Taasham
The third of four flats along the Housatonic River, Litchfield Co., Conn. and Berkshire Co., Mass. (see Pacachkook, Soquawaen, Nanaachquak, Maachemene Pakak)

Taashammik
The fourth of four flats along the Housatonic River, Litchfield Co., Conn. and Berkshire Co., Mass. (see Kenachkehantick, Achneganick, Awaankaniss)

Tachkanak/Tachkanik/Taconic/
Taghkanic
Town, village and mountain range in Columbia Co., N.Y.

Taghpokight
One of two plains on the Catskill Creek, Town of Cairo, Greene Co., N.Y. (see Maquamsasick)

Tapgtonak/Sapgtnack
Falls in Housatonic River, Berkshire Co., Mass. 

Taphaes kotassick
One of two flats along the Kinderhook Creek, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Taskichenock
Wet meadows in North Greenbush, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Twastawekaksipus, meaning “creek flowing from sweet springs”
Claverack Creek, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Waantinuuk
River in Litchfield Co., Conn.

Wachachkeek
Leeds Flat, one of five flats at Leeds, Greene Co., N.Y.

Wachanekasseck
Small creek opposite Catskill, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Waen Naemka
Tract of land along the Murderer’s Creek near Athens, Greene Co., N.Y.

Wampanicksepoot
Green River in Columbia Co., N.Y. and Berkshire Co., Mass.

Wapakosick
River in Columbia Co., N.Y.

Wappennakvias
Sweet River

Wata Pickkaak
Creek in southern Berkshire Co., Mass. Or northern Litchfield Co., Conn.

Wawanaquasick
Location in Town of Livingston, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Weatogue/Weatock
Salisbury, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Wechquatnach
50 mi. downstream from Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Weeatauwashoke
Hill in the Town of Salisbury, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Weeputting
Mountain in Litchfield Co., Conn.

Wichguanachtikak
Second of five large flats at Leeds, Greene Co., N.Y.

Wichquaskaha
One of three flats in southern Columbia Co., N.Y. (see Nickan hooke and Kichpa)

Wimpeting
Location seven miles south of Sharon, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Wishshiag
Wassaic, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Wogaskewackook
Lake in northern Columbia Co., N.Y.

Womunting
Location in Dutchess Co., N.Y.